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COURSE GUIDES DATABASES

The Hulbert Taft, Jr. Library


Foundations: Islamic Empires: Ottoman Empire

 

OTTOMAN EMPIRE (founded 1299)

   

Hagia Sophia, Sancta Sophia, Istanbul (Constantinople), Turkey, c1890-1900. Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Accessed Feb 22, 2021. https://quest.eb.com/search/300_2291292/1/300_2291292/cite.

UNESCO World Heritage Site: Historic Areas of Istanbul

Secondary Sources

Secondary Sources will have more specific information about your topic.

  • Secondary source books written by scholars which present a new interpretation or thesis based upon a synthesis of primary sources, scholarly journal articles, and other secondary sources.
  • Sometimes there will be an entire book, sometimes you may have to assemble information from multiple monographs.
  • Secondary sources will usually have a bibliography of materials for further study, including primary sources, journal articles (which are also secondary sources), and books. 

 

BOOKS ON RESERVE AT THE CIRCULATION DESK 

To ensure equitable access, all reserve materials are to be used only in the library for the duration of the project.

To borrow reserve books:

  1. Ask Library Staff at the Circulation Desk for the specific books you would like to use.
  2. We will retrieve the books from the reserve shelves and sign them out to you.
  3. When you have finished using them or at the end of class, RETURN the books to a Library Staff Member.

General (more than one civilization)

  • The African & Middle Eastern world, 600-1500 / Randall L. Pouwels. DS36.85 .P68 2005
  • An age of empires, 1200-1750 / Marjorie Wall Bingham. D202 .B46 2005
  • Chronicles of the crusades: eyewitness accounts of the wars between Christianity and Islam / edited by Elizabeth Hallam. D151 .C48 1993  PS
  • A history of Islamic societies / Ira M. Lapidus. DS35.63 .L37 2014
  • A history of the modern Middle East / William L. Cleveland. DS62.4 .C53 2013
  • Islam: a short history / Karen Armstrong. BP50 . A69 2000
  • Islam from the prophet Muhammad to the capture of Constantinople / ed. by Bernard Lewis. DS36 855 .I77 1987 vol. I: Politics and war PS
  • Islamic art / David Talbot Rice. N6260 .R53 1965
  • Islamic empires: the cities that shaped civilization from Mecca to Dubai / Justin Marozzi. DS36.855 M37 2020
  • The Oxford history of Islam / edited by John L. Esposito. BP50 . O95 1999
  • The Oxford illustrated history of the Crusades /  Ed. by Jonathan Riley-Smith. D157 .O48 1995
  • Travels of Ibn Battuta / edited by Tim Mackintosh-Smith. G370 .I2 T8513 2003   (Link is to earlier edition available online at the Internet Archive
  • The venture of Islam: conscience and history in a world civilization, vol. 3: The Gunpowder empires and modern times / Marshall G.S. Hodgson. DS 36.85 .H63 v.3  (also an online ebook)

Ottoman Empire

  • Daily life in the Ottoman Empire / Mehrdad Kia. DR432 .K43 2011
  • Everyday life in Ottoman Turkey / Raphaela Lewis. DR432 .L46 1971
  • History of Europe, 1450-1660 / P. J. Helm. D228 H4 1964
  • History of the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey / Stanford J. Shaw and Ezel Kural Shaw (an online ebook)
  • Osman's dream: the history of the Ottoman empire / Carolyn Finkel. DR486 .f56 2006
  • The Ottoman age of exploration / Giancarlo Casale (an online ebook)
  • The Ottoman Empire : the classical age, 1300-1600 / Halil Inalcik ; translated by Norman Itzkowitz and Colin Imber. DR486 .I51 
  • The Ottomans / Andrew Wheatcroft. DR486 .W44 1993
  • Religious transformations in the early modern world: a brief history with documents / Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks. BR252 .W54 2009 PS

PS = contains primary source materials

Primary Sources

Primary Sources

Sources created by those who lived it

Any document, image, or artifact created at the time of the topic being researched is a primary source.

Examples include: eyewitness accounts, memoirs, household and day-to-day objects, clothing, coins, works of art and architecture.

See the Images tab for finding images of artifacts, buildings, coinage, etc from your empire.

Please note: primary source documents are a reflection of the time and culture in which they were created and may contain language or images that are considered offensive today.

 

Primary Sources in Books / eBooks

  • Chronicles of the Crusades: eyewitness accounts of the wars between Christianity and Islam / edited by Elizabeth Hallam. D151 .C48 1993
  • Islam from the prophet Muhammad to the capture of Constantinople / ed. by Bernard Lewis. DS36 855 .I77 1987 vol. I: Politics and war
  • Religious transformations in the early modern world: a brief history with documents / Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks. BR252 .W54 2009 
  • Travels of Ibn Battuta / edited by Tim Mackintosh-Smith. G370 .I2 T8513 2003   (Link is to earlier edition available online at the Internet Archive

 

Primary Sources on the Internet

  • Internet Islamic History Sourcebook Part of the Internet History Sourcebooks Project created by Paul Halsall of Fordham University containing collections of primary full-texts and other useful materials organized by era and by region/culture.

On the arts of the Ottoman Empire:

To find more primary sources on the internet, you can search your terms with the phrase AND documents OR "primary sources"

  • For example: Ottoman AND documents OR "primary sources"

 

Primary Sources in Databases

If you have any questions,

see Mr. Padgett or Ms. Taylor

OR email us at 

spadgett@taftschool.org  

  taylorp@taftschool.org

We're here to help!

 

NoodleTools Tips for Citing Books / eBooks and Primary Sources

PLEASE NOTE: Do not copy and paste complete citations from electronic sources. NoodleTools cannot generate footnotes from copied and pasted citations.

 

To cite a book, first choose the NoodleTools option that best describes where you found it.

  • Database = an electronic book found in a Taft Subscription Database such as ACLS Humanities e-Book.
    • Choose Book.
    • You must provide the permanent URL for your source. Look for any of the following on the page: permalink, persistent link, stable link, durable link, "Get link",Cite, or Citable Link.
    • Choose the name of the database, using the pull-down menu under My library's databases.
    • Complete information about the book (author, title, publication place, publisher, and publication date).
  • Website = an electronic book found on the Internet using a search engine like Google.
    • Choose Book.
    • Copy and paste the URL for the book from your browser address bar. 
    • Enter author, title, publication place, publisher, and publication date. If there's an ISBN, search that number to get the information about the book.
  • Print or In Hand = a book in the Reserve collection behind the main desk or found upstairs in the Main collection.
    • Choose Book.
    • Using information in the book, enter author, title, publication place, publisher, and publication date.

Note: Print and electronic books can also be cited in NoodleTools using the ISBN (International Standard Book Number) . For a print book, look for the ISBN and associated barcode on the back cover or on the back side of the title page. If you don't find it, a library staff member can help. Books published before 1967 won't have an ISBN.

International Standard Book Number - Wikipedia

 

To cite a primary source, first choose the NoodleTools option that best describes where you found it:

  • Database = a document found in a Taft Subscription Database such as Gale in Context: World History.
    • You must provide the permanent URL for your source. Look for any of the following on the page: permalink, persistent link, stable link, durable link, "Get link",Cite, or Citable Link.
  • Website = a document found on the Websites section of the course guide, found through a web directory like SweetSearch or a search engine such as Google. 
  • Print or In Hand = a document found in a book in the library. For example: in a reference book or a secondary source.

Next determine what kind of primary source you are citing:

  • Look at the list of options in NoodleTools. Is it a newspaper article, a speech, a letter, or another item listed? If so, choose that item type.
  • If you are not sure, you can use "Anthology / Collection" which enables you to cite a source found within another source.

AND you can ask Mr. Padgett or Ms. Taylor for help too!