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The Hulbert Taft, Jr. Library


Native American Heritage Month @ Taft: Home

 

 

Click here for a wealth of resources on NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

from The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

 

The first American Indian Day was celebrated in May 1916, in New York. The event culminated an effort by Red Fox James, a member of the Blackfeet Nation, who rode across the nation on horseback seeking approval from 24 state governments to have a day to honor American Indians. In 1990, more than seven decades later, then-President George H.W. Bush signed a joint congressional resolution designating the month of November “National American Indian Heritage Month.” Similar proclamations have been issued every year since 1994 to recognize what is now called “American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month.” 

President Joseph R. Biden

A Proclamation on National Native American Heritage Month

October 31, 2022

 

During National Native American Heritage Month, we celebrate Indigenous peoples past and present and rededicate ourselves to honoring Tribal sovereignty, promoting Tribal self-determination, and upholding the United States’ solemn trust and treaty responsibilities to Tribal Nations...

America has not always delivered on its promise of equal dignity and respect for Native Americans...We must do more to ensure that Native Americans have every opportunity to succeed and that their expertise informs our Federal policy-making...We are also helping Native communities heal from intergenerational trauma caused by past policies...As we look ahead, my Administration will continue to write a new and better chapter in the story of our Nation-to-Nation relationships...We will always honor the profound impact Native Americans continue to have in shaping our Nation and bringing us closer to the more perfect Union we know we can and must be.

 

 

Celebrate Native American Heritage Month with Poetry

 

Honoring Native American Heritage Month with a collection of seven poems by Native American poets,

including U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo

 

For a century, the U.S government believed what was best for Native American kids was to strip them of their families and communities, their culture and language, their hair and clothes. Now, mounting research has demonstrated how this policy has decimated communities and been deadly to Native peoples. “Identification with a particular cultural background and a secure sense of cultural identity is associated with higher self-esteem, better educational attainment (grades and going to college), and is protective against mental health problems, substance use, and other issues for adolescents and adults,” a summary of research by the National Indian Child Welfare Association stated in 2017.

For 24 year old Delmar, learning about traditional practices is a way to honor her heritage and make sense of her place in the world.

 

Facts for Features: American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month

November 2022

 

This Facts for Features presents statistics for American Indian and Alaska Native population, one of the six major race categories defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. These facts are possible thanks to responses to the U.S. Census Bureau’s surveys. 

 

From The New York Times

This week we bring you “A Conversation With Native Americans on Race,” the latest installment in our wide-ranging “Conversation on Race” series. Directed by Michèle Stephenson and Brian Young, the film grapples with the racist contradictions of a country that, many feel, would prefer it if Native Americans didn’t exist.

 

Explore the world of indigenous people and lands using the amazing map app

Native Land Digital

Enter your address to learn upon which native people's land your home sits.
Taft sits on land originally inhabited by Mohican, Paugusett, and Wappinger peoples.