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The Hulbert Taft, Jr. Library


U. S. History: Cold War Primary Sources: Home

eBook Only Search

Use this search to find only ebooks that can be accessed via our library catalog.
This search defaults to a Subject search.

Just type the word "sources" and then your subject and see what comes up!

Type of search?
eBooks only?

If you have any questions,

see Mr. Padgett or Ms. Taylor

OR email us at 

spadgett@taftschool.org  

  taylorp@taftschool.org

We're here to help!

NoodleTools Tips for Citing Primary Sources

To cite a Primary Source, first choose the option that best describes where you found it: 

  • Database = a document found in a Taft Subscription Database such as the New York Times, 1851-2014Modern World History, or Gale eBooks.
  • Website = a document on a website such as Cold War History or another site found through a search engine such as Google.

Next, determine what kind of primary source you are citing: 

  • Look at the list of options in NoodleTools. Is it a newspaper article, a speech, a letter, or another item listed? If so, choose it. 
  • If you're not sure, you can use "Anthology / Collection" which enables you to cite a source found within another source. 

Primary Sources

Any document, image, or artifact created at the time of the topic being researched is a primary source. Examples include eyewitness accounts, autobiographies and memoirs, diaries, letters, speeches, reports, newspapers, household and day-to-day objects, clothing, works of art, architecture, and photographs.

Please note that primary source documents are a reflection of the time and culture in which they were created and may contain language or images that are considered offensive today.

Find Primary Sources in these Reference eBooks

Cold War Reference Library (Database: Gale eBooks) Choose volume 5, Primary Sources

Cuban Missile Crisis: The Essential Reference Guide (Database: Gale eBooks) Scroll to the bottom of the A-Z list to Primary Source and click on the arrow to open the list of documents.

Defining Documents in American History series (Database: Salem History)

Milestone Documents in American History: Exploring the Primary Sources that Shaped America (Database: Salem History)

Understanding U.S. Military Conflicts through Primary Sources (Database: ABC-Clio eBooks) The first click will bring you to the ABC-Clio ebook homepage. Click again to open the ebook itself.

Find Primary Sources in Online Subscription Databases

Historical Newspaper Databases

NOTE: when searching for primary sources in news databases, ALWAYS limit your search to the date range relevant to your topic. Look at other limiters on the advanced search page that might improve your results, such as article, commentary, editorial, essay, feature, front page / cover story, letter to the editor.

History Databases containing Primary Sources

Find Primary Sources on the Internet

NOTE: If a link on one of these sites is dead, try searching the link name using Google or another search engine. If you need assistance, just email Mr. Padgett or Ms. Taylor and we'll get on it!

 

Cold War History A history and documents collection from the Cold War International History Project of the Wilson Center Digital Archive.

Cold War Primary Resources A directory of primary source collections from the Miller Center, University of Virginia. Note: several links do not work; correct, comparable, or related links are below:

Modern History Sourcebook: A Bipolar World A large collection of document links from the Internet History Sourcebooks project by Paul Halsall, Fordham University. If a link to a document is broken, try searching the link name on Google. Can't find it? Email Mr. Padgett or Ms. Taylor.